Overheating Laptop with Int*l Processor on TrueOS Stable


#1

Dear Sir or Madam,

I relatively new with TrueOS and actually very happy with TrueOS performance eventhough dealing with some problems on the installation process. Reading the handbook and the forum helps me to get my laptop up and works with TrueOS.

With TrueOS, I notice my laptop became very hot. I checked the task manager and sees the CPU temperatures is between 70 ~ 85 degrees (Celsius) under normal working conditions. Laptop fan start to works when the temperatures reaching 85 degrees. Please will you let me know if this is normal?

My laptop have an Intl processor and Nvida graphic card, previously on Lin*x I used to install microcode and thermald to help reduce the heat, but in TrueOS I totally have no idea.

Tried to search related topic for this issue but can’t find any. Could you please let me know what to do? Thanks in advance for your help.

Sincerely,
Beno


#2

Hey @bkurniawan. From my experience that is not normal. Have you compared the temperatures you get on other operating systems? How are you testing to get your CPU temperature on TrueOS? How old is your laptop?

Some newer Intel processors can get pretty hot before they shut down to prevent damage, but in general I recommend no more than 75 degrees celsius to prevent damage to other components. For instance, 70 degrees celsius is about the maximum you want to expose your hard drive to. OpenZFS, which TrueOS uses, is very memory intensive and could be causing higher than normal temperatures for you, but it should not in my opinion cause it to go as high as you are describing.

My recommendation would be if the laptop is over a year old to clean that laptop out. Take off the bottom chassis and fan assembly then clean everything thoroughly with compressed air. If you still have issues a copper shim can be a life saver and help dissipate CPU heat. You can buy them on eBay for next to nothing. Put the shim under the heatsink and directly on top of the CPU. Clean off the cheap thermal grease with isopropyl alcohol but be careful not to get it on the board. Reapply arctic silver thermal grease (no cheap stuff!). That’s all I can think of to try off hand.


#3

What is probably happening is that you are not using the right graphical driver for your hardware, resulting in everything being done on your CPU instead of offloading work to the graphics card.

If you have an intel + nvidia laptop, this is generally called an “optimus” laptop and is not supported very well on TrueOS. The best fix for Optimus systems is to enable “discrete” mode within your BIOS - which turns off one of the two graphics cards (usually the nvidia chip is disabled). This option is not always available however - it depends on the manufacturer of the laptop. After that, make sure that you re-run the display wizard from the login screen to ensure that you have the right driver set (“modesetting” for intel, “nvidia” for nvidia).


#4

If You want to check Intel-CPU core temperatures, under FreeBSD and derivatives, make sure:

  1. A similar result appears:

    $ kldstat -dv | grep coretemp
    7 1 0xffffffff824a7000 4d18 coretemp.ko (/boot/kernel/coretemp.ko)
    9 cpu/coretemp (0, 0, 0x0)

  2. If not, make sure:

    $ cat /boot/loader.conf.local | grep coretemp
    coretemp_load=“YES”

  3. In either case, afterwards check:

    $ sysctl -a | grep temperature
    dev.cpu.1.temperature: 70.0C
    dev.cpu.0.temperature: 69.0C


#5

I know the pain of loosing laptop’s dedicated GPU functions due to overheating! :frowning_face:

In my case, the nvidia quadro in my Dell-M4500 went south, due to fan speed control failure of the GPU. It’s the dedicated GPUs that make laptops too HOT inside, because of poor ventilation. Despite critical damage to the accelerated 3D video output of the GPU, that laptop can still do GUI in vesa. My ex said that she can fix it. I said, it’s yours and Good Luck! hehe


#6

Dear @JoshDW19,

I previously works with Windows for many years and then switch to Linux. After trying out TrueOS, I don’t think I would want to switch back to Linux or Windows. The laptop temperature under Linux is pretty high, I often need to use a mini USB portable exhaust fan to get the heat out.

In TrueOS, previously I use SysAdm: Task Manager to check the CPU temperature, but thanks to @bsdtester now I know how to check the temperature on a terminal. Below are the result of the current idle state TrueOS system with Lumina Desktop:

sysctl -a | grep temperature
hw.acpi.thermal.tz0.temperature: 66.1C
dev.cpu.3.temperature: 72.0C
dev.cpu.2.temperature: 72.0C
dev.cpu.1.temperature: 70.0C
dev.cpu.0.temperature: 70.0C

The laptop is pretty old, Asus K43SV (Intel® Core™ i3 2310M with NVIDIA® GeForce® GT 540M 1GB) I did the upgrade with 2 x 4GB DDR3 1333 MHz SDRAM.

Ok, I will try to cleaning up the hardware with compressed air this weekend. Thanks for your answer and recommendation.

Regards,
Beno


#7

Dear @beanpole135,

Thanks for your answer, yes, you are correct. There were no “discrete” mode option in my BIOS. But on the display wizard I have select Nvidia driver and the /etc/rc.conf also shows:

kldload_nvidia=“nvidia-modeset nvidia”

Did this means I have used the correct driver for my system? If so, I will try to cleanup the hardware as @JoshDW19 recommendation and let you know if this helps.

Regards,
Beno


#8

This is my Dell-M4600 laptop’s typical CPU temp, in idle mode with Lumina and few tcp/ip servers in jail:

sysctl -a | grep temperature
hw.acpi.thermal.tz0.temperature: 25.1C
dev.cpu.7.temperature: 54.0C
dev.cpu.6.temperature: 54.0C
dev.cpu.5.temperature: 57.0C
dev.cpu.4.temperature: 57.0C
dev.cpu.3.temperature: 59.0C
dev.cpu.2.temperature: 59.0C
dev.cpu.1.temperature: 51.0C
dev.cpu.0.temperature: 51.0C

But, the System Monitor in Lumina shows CPU temp. 10 degrees lower. So, who knows where the logic&magic comes from. I know that my CPU and GPU fans are blowing hot air OUT:)


#9

Dear @bsdtester,

Thanks for your reference, really appreciated as I am relatively new to FreeBSD and derivatives, so this is good for me to know and learn. Thank you!

Dear @ichibiri,

Did the temperature you show above achieved if we are not using nvidia driver and using vesa instead?
Please let me know.

Thanks and regards,
Beno


#10

If you have an intel + nvidia laptop, this is generally called an “optimus” laptop and is not supported very well on TrueOS.

Can you provide background on where the term optimus comes from and what causes it to not be well supported?


#11

@bkurniawan

Dear @ichibiri,

Did the temperature you show above achieved if we are not using nvidia driver and using vesa instead?
Please let me know.

Thanks and regards,
Beno
This is my Dell-M4600 laptop’s typical CPU temp, in idle mode with Lumina and few tcp/ip servers in jail:

sysctl -a | grep temperature
hw.acpi.thermal.tz0.temperature: 25.1C
dev.cpu.7.temperature: 54.0C
dev.cpu.6.temperature: 54.0C
dev.cpu.5.temperature: 57.0C
dev.cpu.4.temperature: 57.0C
dev.cpu.3.temperature: 59.0C
dev.cpu.2.temperature: 59.0C
dev.cpu.1.temperature: 51.0C
dev.cpu.0.temperature: 51.0C

The above results indicate CPU temperature reading with AMD/ATI Fire-Pro/M5950 video adapter inside my Dell Precision M-4600 laptop supported by 3D accelerated video driver at 1920x1080 display resolution - NOT VESA.

Graphic card information:                                                                                            
vendor='Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. [AMD/ATI]'
device='Whistler [Radeon HD 6730M/6770M/7690M XT]'

glxinfo
name of display: :0
display: :0  screen: 0
direct rendering: Yes
server glx vendor string: SGI
server glx version string: 1.4

You have nvidia video adapter which requires different driver. In my other post, I mentioned about my Dell-M4500 laptop with nvidia quadro video adapter which lost its 3D accelerated high/res. display capabilities. But, the GPU was able to display video in vesa mode, tho only in TureOS. MSO$ and various *Linux installations wouldn’t even allow me to hack in any type of video driver so I could see something other than empty black screen. I tried all known drivers and xorg.conf tricks in TureOS to make that nvidia GPU display high resolution, but no luck. In vesa mode the CPU temps in that laptop were in the high 50’s C range.

PS.
It seems that the so called Optimus Technology (a switchable graphics subsystem) is involded in some of the laptops with dedicated GPU. So then, that Dell M-4500 may also have on board integrated graphics chip and that’s why it can do vesa. Tho, there is nothing in the M-4500 BIOS to indicate that. And why MSO$ and *Linux cannot deal with this M-4500 broken nvidia GPU(s) or the integrated graphics chip, if there is one?


#12

pciconf -lv look for anything that has “class” of display. That tells you what hardware is at least seen by the kernel.

I’d guess “NDA” by the hardware vendor is required and every one may be different. If you internet search enough, there are usually references to switch that needs to be flipped internally. This is not a physical switch, but more of a logical one (I2C device or similar) that you can’t get information on. But if one loads the correct Nvidia driver from Nvidia.com, you think we’d get the feature, right? Well, I don’t think we do. Of course since it works fine under Windows, “it’s not Nvidias problem”.


#13

“Optimus” was the term coined for the intel/nvidia partnership where the intel integrated graphics chip would be used for primary functions, but it would actively switch over to the nvidia gpu when more intense graphical acceleration was required. FreeBSD/TrueOS does not have the ability to do this active switching, resulting in degraded functionality. The level of degredation varies depending on laptop manufacturer:

  1. Two discrete GPUs are available: best support by just disabling one and using the other all the time.
  2. Discrete intel chip, partial nvidia chip: still somewhat supported via the intel/modesetting driver, it can just never switch over to the nvidia gpu and the dual cards makes the automatic driver selection quite a bit more difficult.
  3. Partial intel and partial nvidia chips: gpu acceleration will not work at all, neither driver can access enough of a chip to function on its own. The vesa or scfb fallback drivers are the only ones that will work, with cpu-acceleration only.

#14

Dear @JoshDW19,

Thank you for your recommendation, I did as you mentioned above and now my latop is way much cooler…

sysctl -a | grep temperature
hw.acpi.thermal.tz0.temperature: 50.1C
dev.cpu.3.temperature: 55.0C
dev.cpu.2.temperature: 55.0C
dev.cpu.1.temperature: 53.0C
dev.cpu.0.temperature: 53.0C

Again, many thanks for your help.

Sincerely,
Beno